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Looking for a Lead QA Developer | Full-stack Super-Tester Job

Recently I saw a Job description with title ‘Lead QA Developer’. In my view this is the perfect depiction of today’s changing QA landscape where a Tester is expected to – Lead, i.e. planning, strategy, team management and reporting – Quality Assurance, i.e. Test methodology, process, defects management, agile, requirements analysis, test techniques, etc. and – Developer, i.e. hands-on knowledge of programming languages like Java, Python, C#, etc. to build automation frameworks and tools for validation.

You can run, you can hide but you can’t escape the fact 😉 The industry is fast moving towards automation where testers are expected to be technical, process-oriented, tools know-how, testing mindset, and what not.

What are your views?

Full-stack Super-Tester is the Future

AKASH gaurav | Software Test Engineer at LearningMate

but one thing whatever will come and  go but manual will be there forever because automation although making work easier but cant think as  a human being still its that effective than it is previous

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Prasad Bhokare | Associate Software Engineer at Bentley Systems

Perfectly all right…we have entered and mastering world of agile development and an expert can’t stick to one domain working in the world having diverse techs and platforms available out their on the market. We have to become agile to leverage advantage of trending software development processes.

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Shruti Mehta | Quality Assurance Team Lead at Communication Crafts

Change is the only constant!! A change for good is always worthy. It was just few years back that Testing itself was not so much in demand. But now, with new domains and technologies it vital to have Leaders who can carve path ahead.

It’s even great with so many free/paid courses now available for a person to learn and develop. Thanks for sharing!!

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Ray Marshall | Test Analyst/Test Lead at White Clarke Group

A pre written automation script is only ever as good as what is written and defined. By that i mean that a manual tester would be able to say “What if I did this?”, “What if I try that?” Whereas an automation script will simply follow a predefined path and potentially never find anything? If a script (either manual or automation) is never evolved, at some point it will be useless at finding defects (pesticide paradox) as the path that the script follows may eventually have all defects fixed and therefore only proverbs that it works. There will always be a need for manual testers, however it would likely be a good idea to learn automation if you get the chance.

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amit tambe | Project Lead at Harman formerly Symphony Teleca Corporation

I don’t think its cool. it’s ambiguous. It sounds like you are developing something for quality assurance.

Only Automation scripts will not assure quality, they can do checking off something in a particular environment with no intelligence and emotions and testing skills.  Assurance is not only tester’s business

Like you all know we test software and I like myself to be called a tester as automation is one of the activity I do to test the software also that’s not the only thing.

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Varsha Bansal | Experienced Quality Analyst || Test Automation || JMeter || Agile

Yes true! but you see most of the times companies ask for programming skills and in an interview they ask only automation but later on they give candidate the manual work where he/she has to create opportunity for themselves by convincing the client for automation. Don’t you think it’s weird? If you cannot give candidate the automation then why you judge them on their automation skills?

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Chester Pereira | Senior Quality Assurance Engineer at Indecomm Global Services

I agree a 100%. Most of these expectations are limited to the interviewing process. In my experience, if the position is not for 100% test automation, you will be stuck with manual testing.

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Prashant Kumar | Royal bank of Scotland -D&A Analyst

Testing never generates direct revenue its all indirect revenue people not care about testers and continuously ignoring but believe me if you want to grow leave  QA profile and switch in any profile which generates direct revenue to the company.

Automation Testing is the new Generic in QA Career

Rajeshwar Shingare | Project Manager and Test Lead

No matter how much technical we become, or have tools know-how…I am afraid the market demands shouldn’t affect the new guys entering the testing industry with a confused mindset of becoming an SDET and forgetting the basics.

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gurleen Sawhney | Quality Analyst at moldedbits

You are right sir. The industry is changing and so should the testers skill set. One should be good at both Manual and automation as I also feel with the changing trends most of the procedures in testing will get automated. I recently wrote a blog post on the same.

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Siddharth Mehta | Sr. Software Quality Analyst at Voylla Fashions

This the truth.. Testing with programming skills is what required in industry. If a tester knows how the developer has implemented the functionality, what logic or algorithm he used then tester will be able to test  functionality with ease and can go much deep into it.

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Sasikanth Manavarthi | Software Engineering Sr.Analyst at Accenture

Problem comes with having no clarity about what QAs do. Recently I read a job description asking for expertise in C#.net, Java, Python , Node.js, Angular. But what should be expected from a good QA is Good Programming skills to develop automation , ability to understand application/system architecture, effective test design and execution skills.

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Nitesh Jain | SDET/CSM/ISTQB-TestManager

QA is becoming the superman  (or superwomen ) job. and that’s good. Test engineers have to be ready to learn+implement  certain technical coding skill. 

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Zachary Borrelli | Senior Test Engineer at The App Business

I must disagree with this part of your post:

“The industry is fast moving towards automation where testers are expected to be technical, process-oriented, tools know-how, testing mindset, and what not.”

I think it’s very narrow-minded to think that an exploratory/functional tester adds less than an automation tester and that automation is the next step in a tester’s evolution.

It’s true that automation is the logical step for a lot of testers as it’s a fairly low bar in terms of difficulty of coding and just the sheer nicety of watching your tools come to life to test something.

But as long as there are systems, there will always need to be a human touch and a human eye involved with the testing of a product. Computers are dumb and will be for a long time.

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Paul Maxwell-Walters | Software Test Analyst at Avocado Consulting

I think you may be reading a bit too much into it. I see just it as “leader of a team of people who write test automation”. It’s a reference to a specific job in a niche area of technical test automation and I don’t think reflects on the entire industry.

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Venu S | Director – Test & Delivery, CoC SW Platform

Testers who restrict themselves only to application level will suffer. Industry need testers who can look beyond business logic, who can understand SW architecture, design, API and write automation scripts. I can also imagine testers doing beyond bug reporting (eg: analysis of defect pattern and predicting  the probability of defect location very soon..)

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